NFB Krafters Division Blog

When I was asked about what I found best to use to thread sewing machine needles

When I was asked about what I found best to use to thread sewing machine needles

*** Newest Find

 

I have found this to work the best especially on the embroidery machine. [Don’t know how well it will work on regular sewing machines.]

 

I have been using Large eye beading needles which are usually used when threading seed beads on to cord.  It is a thin piece of wire attached on both ends and they are like 5” long and bend in the middle.  They are long enough to put in eye of the needle & put thread in between wires and pull thru to the opposite side.  I find it easier to get the tip into the groove on the needle and with pressure can guide it down to the eye of the needle.

 

I also use size 14 needles top stitch needles.  The needles are thicker which makes the needles a little larger and the top stitch needles have a larger eye.  The size 14 machine needles embroidery needles have an eye a little smaller than the top stitching needles due to decorative threads which might be a bit thinner used for top stitching.

 

Joyce Kane

 

comprehensive List of Knitting Abbreviations

comprehensive List of Knitting Abbreviations

Are you reading a pattern and find a term you are not familiar with? Use this list to find out what the abbreviation means.

alt alternate
approx approximately
beg begin or beginning
BO bind off
CC contrasting color
CO cast on, cast off
cm centimeter
cn cable needle
cont continue
dec decrease
dpn double pointed needles
eor every other row
est established
inc increase
k or K knit
k1, s1, psso knit one, slip one, pass slipped stitch over
k2tog knit 2 together
k2tog tbl knit 2 together through back loop
MC main color
M1 make one
mm millimeter
p or P purl
p2tog purl 2 together
p2tog tbl purl 2 together through back loop
pat pattern
pm place marker
psso pass slip stitch over
rem remaining rep repeat
Rev St st reverse stockinette stitch
RS right side
rnd round
sm slip marker
SSK slip 1, slip 1, knit two together
sl slip
sl 1, k1, psso or SKP slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped st over
st(s) stitch(es)
St st stockinette stitch, stocking stitch
tbl through back loop(s)
tog together
WS wrong side
wyib with yarn in back
wyif with yarn in front
yfon yarn forward over needle
yfrn yarn forward and round needle
yo yarn over
yon yarn over needle
yrn yarn round needle
* repeat instructions following or between asterisk as indicated
[ ] repeat instructions inside brackets as indicated

 

 

Knitting Terminology and Abbreviations

This post will be helpful to both beginner as well as experienced knitters needing to refresh their memory.

 

Knitting terminology and abbreviations

 

 

Terminology and Abbreviations

  • Working yarn – the yarn that is coming from your ball of yarn.
  • Yarn tail – the section of yarn that is hanging from the starting point of your work.
  • Front of work – The side of your work that is facing you when you are holding your needles.
  • Back of work – The side of your work that is facing away from you when you are holding your needles.
  • Right side of work = RS – This is the side of your work that will be public facing when you are finished.
  • Wrong side of work = WS – This is the side of your work that is not intended to be seen on the finished project.  The inside of a sweater would be an example of this.  If your fabric is reversible, you will not have a “wrong side”.
  • Yarn in Front = YF – Your working yarn is on the side of your work that is facing you.
  • Yarn in Back = YB – Your working yarn is on the side of your work that is facing away from you.
  • Right = Rt
  • Left = Lt
  • Right Hand = RH
  • Left Hand = LH
  • Needle or Needles = NDL or NDLS
  • Right needle – Assuming that you are knitting right handed, the Right Needle is the one being held in your right hand and you are creating your new stitches with it.
  • Left Needle – Assuming that you are knitting right handed, it is the needle that you are holding in your left hand and is the one holding your stitches when you start a new row.
  • Working needle – This is the right needle since the new stitches are being created with this needle (assuming that you are knitting right handed).
  • Stitch or Stitches = st or sts
  • Cast on = CO – the process of creating initial stitches such as at the beginning of your project.  For this project you can use any cast on technique you are familiar with.
  • Bind Off = BO = the process of finishing a stitch at the end of your project so that the stitch does not come undone.  In this project you will not only be binding off at the end of your project, but also at various points in the middle of the project.
  • Knit = K – This is usually followed by a number which indicates how many stitches to knit.
  • Knit 2 Together = K2TOG – This means to treat 2 stitches as 1 and knit them.
  • Yarn Over = YO – Wrap your working yarn around your working needle to create a new stitch.
  • Slip or Slip Stitch = sl or sl st – Insert your working needle into the stitch as if to Purl it, but do not make a new stitch.  Just use your working needle to slip the stitch off of the original needle as it remains on the working needle.  This is also known as Slip Stitch Purl Wise (SPW).
  • Slip Purl-wise = SPW – Insert your needle into the stitch as if to purl it and slip it off of the original needle and keep it on your working needle.
  • Slip knit-wise = SKW – Insert your needle into the stitch as if to knit it and slip it off of the original needle and keep it on your working needle.  This will create a twist in the stitch.
  • Place marker = PM – Place a stitch marker on your working needle.
  • Slip Marker = SM – Move your stitch marker from one needle to the other.
  • Remove marker = RM – Remove the stitch marker from your needle and set it aside.
  • Turn Work = TW – Switch the needles in your hand.  Your Right needle becomes your Left needle, and your Left needle becomes your Right needle.  You are used to doing this at the end of a row, but with a Turn Work instruction, you are in the middle of the row and you have stitches on both needles.
  • Double Stitch = DS – Once created, a Double Stitch will have 4 arms instead of 2 legs.  I think it looks like 2 arms on the front of your needle are interlocked with the 2 arms on the back of the needle.
  • Wrap & Turn = W&T – This is the entire sequence that you will be learning.
  • German Short Row – This is the entire sequence you will be learning.

 

Dictionary of Knitting and Crochet Abbreviations: Lion Brand Yarn

http://www.lionbrand.com/cgi-bin/faq-search.cgi?dictionaryOfAbbreviations=1

 

 

Submitted by Annette C

 

 

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Knitting Needle and Crochet Hook Equivalents

Knitting Needle and Crochet Hook Equivalents

Needle 0, 2mm hook
needle 1, 2.25MM, hook B-1
needle 2, 2.75 MM, hook C-2
needle 3, 3.25 MM, hook D-3
needle 4, 3.5 MM hook E-4
needle 5, 3.75 MM hook F-5
needle 6, 4 MM, hook G-6
needle 7, 4.5 MM, hook 7 (no letter)
needle 8, 5 MM, hook H-8
needle 9,5.5 MM, hook I-9
Needle 10, 6 MM, hook J-10
Needle 10-1/2, 6.5 MM, Hook K-10-1/2
Needle 11, 8 MM, hook L-11
Needle 13, 9MM, hook M/N-13
Needle 15, 10 MM, hook N/P-15

 

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